Digital work – Urabandai SS http://urabandai-ss.com/ Mon, 28 Mar 2022 15:25:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://urabandai-ss.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/cropped-icon-32x32.png Digital work – Urabandai SS http://urabandai-ss.com/ 32 32 Product Overview: Skan’s Digital Work Process Monitoring Software https://urabandai-ss.com/product-overview-skans-digital-work-process-monitoring-software/ Mon, 28 Mar 2022 15:25:03 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/product-overview-skans-digital-work-process-monitoring-software/

Think of it as a form of telematics for work – a sensor enabling digital work done at the interface level for all the desktop machines in an office or department.

“Scan… [gives] you the true nature of the work that runs in the company,” explained co-founder and CEO Avinash Misra (pictured). “It’s software that sits on the desktops of people who work, and it watches every action people take to create a very nuanced map of how work is done in that department or company.”

The company’s Skan Process Intelligence platform uses artificial intelligence, computer vision and machine learning to achieve this, creating a tool designed not to interrupt employees while it gathers vital information about work process.

Skan (officially known on its website as Skan AI) was launched in 2018 and launched its initial software a year later. The company currently employs approximately 72 people, with headquarters in Menlo Park, California, and a presence in Seattle, Bangalore, Boston, Ottawa and elsewhere. Misra says it has already developed significant traction for the technology, with “some of the biggest insurance companies and banks in the world” as customers.

Insurance customers include AXA and Cigna, Misra noted.

No integration required

Although it takes time for customers to learn how to use Skan, there is no integration per se into customer systems. There is still a process to follow though, starting with dashboards – visual displays of data.

According to Misra, the company first provides dashboards to interested customers, outlining the types of things that can be made visible with Skan software, including turnaround time, cycle time, contact time. Then there is a brief conversation about how other customers are using the software or what customers can get from the process. However, the main focus is on what is possible with the technology.

“This is a look at the capabilities of some of our software and the ability to see what kind of dashboards or… lighting can be integrated into those business processes. [we] be the process customers choose,” Misra said.

Skan also explores the amount of applications involved in the main business processes that he typically studies, and what the business can gain or lose in conjunction with certain guardrails and what regulatory issues are at stake.

If all of this comes together, then Skan and the client move forward with the software, which constantly monitors work actions in order to optimize or improve processes.

Then, as Misra describes, Skan deploys two individual pieces of software. The first is a small piece of secure software installed on individual workstations, which connects to a server that the customer owns and manages, and to which Skan does not have access. This is where the data generated by Skan’s desktop monitoring resides under the control of the client. Skan sends its algorithms to client servers to help them surface metadata and generate process maps, so clients can view their data and study the results.

Confidentiality is key, Misra said.

“This has been specifically designed with the necessary privacy and security concerns of the organizations we work in, as we are looking at work-related screens [proprietary client data] and we don’t want access to it,” Misra said.

“Our complete separation between our algorithms and their data…is in place for them,” Misra added. “That’s the only setup they have to do. Everything else is automated, the act of capturing flows, bringing out process maps, looking at the data coming out and seeing how things change. This is all built into the software.

From there, customers receive metadata-based process maps and can review potential opportunities to modify their business processes.

Importantly, Skan does not need to integrate its software into client systems.

“We don’t need any integration with any given system to be able to generate the process maps,” Misra said.

In total, the process takes six weeks to two months, from contract to implementation.

Planned expansion

So far, Skan has raised approximately $20 million in venture capital, including seed round and Series A funding.

Misra confirmed that the company is “having conversations for a future raise” very soon.

Recruitment is also planned through 2022 and beyond, for sales and marketing, customer relations and product engineering. There is also a new in-house recruiter to help manage hiring in what has been a tough market.

“Based on all projections, we’ll be… well over 100 people by the end of the year,” Misra said.

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Is your digital work reaching the right people? https://urabandai-ss.com/is-your-digital-work-reaching-the-right-people/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 10:24:33 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/is-your-digital-work-reaching-the-right-people/

When arts organizations embark on a new production, whether adapting an existing title for stage or screen, or creating a new interactive digital product, it is often assumed that the most creative thinking lies on the first steps.

What follows – the mechanics of launching a show through to the final presentation to the public – can sometimes lack momentum. Reflecting this creativity at an early stage in the final cast of a play is where the most exciting results are found.

Over the past two years, organizations have been looking for ways to diversify their revenue streams by monetizing their digital programs during these unprecedented difficult times. Artists, producers and marketers also had to work in innovative ways to reach wider audiences, planning multi-level distribution campaigns.

Reach the nation in their living rooms

Open Clasp, a female theater company based in the North East, imagined a new play just before the first confinement. The show, Sugar, spotlights three women who are “passing their time.” Carly McConnell, its creative producer, said: “Sugar is a state of the nation production, so it was important for us to reach the nation – people sitting in their chairs at home watching on their TVs. “.

Convinced it should have a home on BBC iPlayer, accessible to a national audience at a time when domestic violence was on the rise, Open Clasp approached The Space looking for a connection. The conviction paid off and it was hosted on the platform in the summer of 2020.

To celebrate, Open Clasp installed a plaque at one of the women’s centers involved in co-creating the characters in the play. “The plaques recognized the strength and resilience of the women who helped us create Sugar and trusted us to tell their stories in hopes of making change a reality,” McConnell said.

“There was great pride in our community to have stories of working class women, portrayed by talented actors, available across the UK on a national platform, in people’s living rooms.”

The importance of partnerships

This successful mission to align production with the BBC brand might have marked the end of a successful campaign for some. But the Open Clasp team knew an important part of their community would be left out: those to whom their art spoke most directly.

They were convinced that women at HMP Low Newton, who co-created the show, should be able to see it, as well as women with similar experience in prisons across the country.

So they formed a partnership with Wayout TV, an educational television channel operating inside prisons. As women did not have access to BBC iPlayer, Open Clasp worked with Wayout TV to broadcast to some 45,000 cells across the prison grounds, allowing women to see their lives reflected in Sugar as well.

While some of the more inventive approaches involve such free viewing plans, there are also opportunities for experimentation in the world of monetized content.

Exploring wider horizons

Ex Cathedra’s Christmas Music by Candlelight was a 2019 Space commission. His company’s managing director, Peter Trethewey, wanted the film to be available for future release, although it was not picked up immediately.

The main goal was to reach a wider geographic audience. This was achieved through their initial free online distribution. By removing some of the barriers to the public, people were able to try something new, risk-free, and the company had other opportunities in sight.

When theaters were forced to close due to the pandemic, Andrew Lloyd Webber’s group Really Useful launched a family-focused YouTube channel – The Shows Must Go On. The Space offered them content that we thought would appeal to their demographics.

Christmas Music by Candlelight was selected as part of their ad-based video on demand (AVOD), receiving a share of ad revenue. It garnered 70,000 views and global reach, with large American audiences as well as significant viewership in Canada, Australia and Germany.

In 2021, the company fulfilled a long-held ambition when Sky Arts rebroadcast the film on Christmas Eve morning.

Have a clear distribution goal

Having a clear distribution goal from the start has been key to the overall success of Ex Cathedra. This is something The Space always impresses on any company taking on a digital capture project.

But it’s also important to be realistic about income. The distribution fee they received was modest and, as Trethewey puts it, “we don’t expect to recoup the costs of making the film, so it was only possible with initial funding from The Space”.

Broadcasting is not easy. Opportunities to earn a large income are limited and competition for audiences is at an all time high. But with clear goals, forward planning, and a creative approach, it’s possible to get your work done by the right people at the right time.

Sarah Fortescue is Head of Distribution at The Space (Computational Arts).

www.thespace.org
@thespacearts

This article, sponsored and contributed by The Space, is part of a series highlighting new ways to create and distribute digital content and exploring the wealth of new online technologies and platforms..

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Navy says digital work instructions and lessons learned improve construction of third Ford-class carrier https://urabandai-ss.com/navy-says-digital-work-instructions-and-lessons-learned-improve-construction-of-third-ford-class-carrier/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 15:26:59 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/navy-says-digital-work-instructions-and-lessons-learned-improve-construction-of-third-ford-class-carrier/

SAN DIEGO — Aircraft carrier builder Newport News Shipbuilding is revamping its processes to become more efficient as it builds the Gerald R. Ford class of carriers, a company official said.

Brian Fields, vice president of carrier construction for CVN-80 and CVN-81, told reporters Feb. 18 that the company has a build plan on the Gerald R. Ford, but lessons learned are dragging down costs and timing as the company works through the John F. Kennedy and now the Enterprise.

A lesson concerns crane lifting of large modules or supermodules. Given the vastness of aircraft carriers, labor constructs the steel framework of the ship’s segments, which can then be fitted with pipes and cables. These modules are then lifted by crane and placed on the hull.

Fields said the company has learned to use even larger supermodules, thus requiring fewer cranes to get the pieces into place.

“Some of our super lifts [on Enterprise] have incorporated what on [Ford and Kennedy] were in some cases 10, 15 erections with a crane – building a large supermodule,” he said. “We see a lot more opportunities to equip earlier in the build process, which provides a lot of efficiency just based on where the work is being done.”

Fields said the company also tries to group steel structures into “unit families,” where the parts are not identical but similar enough that lessons can still be applied from part to part. The sequencing on Ford and Kennedy had been based on which pieces of steel were needed and in what order to form modules that could be stacked in the correct order. The new changes on Enterprise mean some steel parts are built early to need them – but Fields said “localized learning” could occur when similar parts are built consecutively in a “batch manufacturing process”.

Fields said the company is seeing similar learning among its 2,500 suppliers across the country.

But, he noted, one driver of supplier learning is the stability that comes with the Navy’s two-carrier purchase of Enterprise and the Doris Miller in 2019. Fields said Newport News Shipbuilding and the Navy were in talks about how to purchase and finance aircraft carriers in the future to maintain this optimal build schedule and the industry-based hull-to-hull learning created from the two-ship contract.

Fields also noted that the Ford class was designed in a digital 3D environment, rather than using traditional blueprint drawings. The associated step-by-step digital work instructions were not ready for the first two ships, so Ford and Kennedy were built by craftsmen using paper drawings derived from the digital plans – although Kennedy was used for experience the first digital work instructions and get feedback from employees.

Starting with Enterprise, shipyard workers used laptops with digital work instructions for each step, complete with 3D images that can be zoomed and rotated.

“It gives the mechanics a much clearer picture of what they are supposed to be doing. This helps with the quality of the first shot. It helps young artisans, who sometimes we find it takes as long to learn how to read drawings as it does to develop craft skills,” Fields said.

Enterprise and Doris Miller will be built entirely with these digital work instructions, a first for the Navy.

Fields said the Navy has invested significantly in the development of the 3D product model and digital work instructions, as they will be the basis not only for the construction of aircraft carriers and submarines in Newport News, but also life-cycle maintenance work at the Navy’s four public shipyards.

Fields said Newport News Shipbuilding has made a “generational investment” in purchasing laptop computers for all hourly workers so they can access digital work instructions. But, he said, the investment produces other benefits, giving workers immediate access to resources such as procedures, troubleshooting manuals and more, as well as greater access to their supervisors.

These same tools and processes will be used to build the Columbia-class ballistic missile submarine and the next-generation SSN(X) attack submarine. Future ship classes will all join this same digital environment, Fields said.

Megan Eckstein is a naval warfare reporter at Defense News. She has covered military news since 2009, with a focus on US Navy and Marine Corps operations, acquisition programs and budgets. She has reported on four geographic fleets and is happiest when recording stories from a ship. Megan is an alumnus of the University of Maryland.

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India and ASEAN approve digital work plan to tackle use of stolen mobile handsets https://urabandai-ss.com/india-and-asean-approve-digital-work-plan-to-tackle-use-of-stolen-mobile-handsets/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/india-and-asean-approve-digital-work-plan-to-tackle-use-of-stolen-mobile-handsets/

The work plan was approved during the 2nd ASEAN Digital Ministers’ Meeting (ADGMIN) with India, which was held virtually on Friday.

India and ASEAN countries have jointly approved a work plan under which they will develop a system to combat the use of stolen and counterfeit mobile handsets, among others, an official statement said on Saturday. The work plan was approved during the 2nd ASEAN Digital Ministers’ Meeting (ADGMIN) with India, which was held virtually on Friday.

“The Ministers’ Meeting approved the India-ASEAN Digital Work Plan 2022. The work plan includes a system to combat the use of stolen and counterfeit mobile handsets, wifi access network interface for public internet national, capacity building and knowledge sharing in emerging areas in the field of information and communication technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), 5G, advanced satellite communication, cybercrime , etc.,” the statement read.

ADGMIN is an annual meeting of telecommunications ministers from 10 ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) countries – Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam – and dialogue partner countries – Australia, Canada, China, EU, India, Japan, Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Russia, UK and USA.

The Ministry of Telecommunications in December 2019 had launched a portal to help people in Delhi-NCR block and trace their stolen or lost mobile phones. The project is supported by the Central Equipment Identity Register (CEIR) system, which was undertaken by the telecommunications department to address security, theft and other issues, including reprogramming of mobile handsets.

During the meeting, Minister of State for Communications Devusinh Chauhan said that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) enables and strengthens democratic systems and institutions through increased engagement between citizens and government. State.

He added that the use of ICT promotes freedom of expression, human rights and the free flow of information in addition to expanding the possibilities of citizens to participate in the decision-making process and has the potential to transform the lives of people living in rural areas, according to the statement.

Chauhan said technology has become a powerful tool in mitigating the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, which is not only a challenge for the public health system but also has a negative impact on the economy and the social order of countries.

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Intoware launches digital work instruction platform for oil and gas workers https://urabandai-ss.com/intoware-launches-digital-work-instruction-platform-for-oil-and-gas-workers/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/intoware-launches-digital-work-instruction-platform-for-oil-and-gas-workers/

Intoware announced the launch of its next-generation SaaS digital work instruction platform for web browsers, “WorkfloPlus-Web”, designed to connect the oil and gas frontline.

This new iteration enables oil and gas operators to transform paper-based procedures into smart digital workflows that are now accessible through a web browser, while opening the platform to operating systems such as Microsoft Windows for seamless integrated working. .

“Our developers listened to customer feedback and found new ways for workers to create, access schedules and manage maintenance tasks using WorkfloPlus,” said Lee McDonald, Chief Technology Officer at Intoware. “While already available on Android and iOS, ‘WorkfloPlus-Web’ offers accessibility through your web browser, so frontline workers will be able to do everything they can on their mobile or handheld device, now through their desktop or device browser.

“WorkfloPlus is built with open APIs that connect the platform to third party systems such as ERP, PLM, CRM and Asset Management. As WorkfloPlus is unlikely to be the only digital “tool” within your business, the work being performed may require information held in existing systems, meaning they need to connect for data to flow easily. “WorkfloPlus-Web” further simplifies this process integration. »

This means that procedures such as asset inspections can be performed as a workflow, where completed data is transmitted in a format to satisfy a required system such as IBM Maximo and SAP, which in turn allows extract documents and convert them into complete tasks. This integration of workflow processes has led to the digitization of over 1,500 North Sea asset maintenance inspections, resulting in a 200% increase in productivity for Intoware’s customer, Petrofac.

If systems are not integrated through open APIs in this way, it means that these processes can become complicated by the number of different applications involved to perform a single procedure. Each time a worker, for example, switches to a different system, it wastes their time and interrupts their concentration on the work at hand.

Some of the benefits of integrating WorkfloPlus with enterprise systems are:

  • User management – allowing external systems to create, modify or delete users as needed, especially useful when a workforce is traveling with a large number of temporary contractors.
  • External scheduling – if work schedules exist in an ERP or PLM tool, an integration layer can create a scheduled task in WorkfloPlus for each activity, potentially extracting files, drawings and metadata and attaching them to a task before scheduling it to be completed by the date and by the person specified in the external system.
  • Parts ordering automation – where WorkfloPlus collects data related to parts usage for repairs, this data could be fed into an ERP system to automate spare parts purchasing.

Read the latest issue of Oilfield Technology in its entirety for free: Issue 4 2021

The issue begins with a report from Rystad Energy focusing on the outlook for the upstream industry in the Middle East. The rest of the issue is dedicated to features covering production optimization, drills, pipeline integrity, health and safety, and more.

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Read the article online at: https://www.oilfieldtechnology.com/digital-oilfield/13012022/intoware-launches-digital-work-instruction-platform-for-oil-and-gas-workers/

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Digital work: the next work revolution – News TRENDS https://urabandai-ss.com/digital-work-the-next-work-revolution-news-trends/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/digital-work-the-next-work-revolution-news-trends/

Driven by metrics like daily active users, companies are working to engage us all in e-commerce, media, entertainment, and social connections, among others. But these are all activities that we do in addition to work. We probably spend more time at work than on most other daily activities. Work occupies an important place in our intellectual and emotional life. It gives us financial security and a sense of purpose, meaning and identity. Therefore, what we do at work and how we do it matters.

Driven by metrics like daily active users, companies are working to engage us all in e-commerce, media, entertainment, and social connections, among others. But these are all activities that we do in addition to work. We probably spend more time at work than on most other daily activities. Work occupies an important place in our intellectual and emotional life. It gives us financial security and a sense of purpose, meaning and identity. Therefore, what we do at work and how we do it matters.

Today, office work has become digital work and the pandemic has accelerated this shift. Communication and productivity tools have streamlined digital work to make it more efficient and less cumbersome. However, what is not well understood is how we work – do we all work the same way, how do we differ, what we enjoy, what we find boring, frustrating or painful, among others . Understanding how we work is a precursor to what we can do to change our work experience.

But, compared to the billions invested in building social media platforms to help us connect with people, find jobs, share cat photos, etc., there has been a much smaller investment in technology to understand the human experience at work and do it better. Case in point: When was the last time you heard of technological innovations to help teams discover workplace mentorship opportunities, ease frustrations, find help, or share pain?

How big is this problem? It is estimated that more than 500 million office workers worldwide spend at least 5 hours a day working digitally. Even though the world spends billions of dollars on office work, we have yet to see improving the employee experience become an imperative economic problem that technology can address. Finally, the pandemic has isolated a large proportion of office workers at home, giving them more opportunities to change jobs around the world and therefore making it more difficult to retain talent. Therefore, it is more important than ever to care about the employee experience.

Organizations are paying attention to these concerns, but are stifled by the lack of sufficient technological innovation. For example, companies hire people who manually interview a few people on teams, collect high-level data through interviews, and then offer advice on how to streamline the work. But these approaches are incomplete, analogical and not scalable. Can technology offer a better solution? Here is a possibility. Recent advances in computing and machine learning offer new ways to use data to understand and improve the employee experience. The approach involves (1) sampling how teams interact with software at work, (2) applying machine learning to this data to decipher teams’ work patterns, and (3) identifying the weak points of the team from these models and to improve the experience of the team. An invariant of this approach is to preserve privacy by anonymizing the individual and instead focusing on team models.

The key idea is to treat the very act of doing work as a source of data versus traditional approaches that only treat the result of work as data (e.g. how many deals does a team have concluded?). This data is then useful in driving change in the workplace. At the heart of this vision are “work graphs,” maps that are a sequence of connected steps that teams perform to get work done. Work graphs are automatically generated using machine learning to learn how teams interact with software at work and provide a foundation for understanding work at any scale. These maps of how teams are performing are similar to the World Wide Web graphs that power search engines or the connections between people (social graphs) that power most social platforms.

A work graph is the DNA of how digital work happens. And like DNA, the working graph is a single source of information for understanding, diagnosing, and resolving multiple data issues.

A team’s experience at work can be distilled from the patterns in the work graph. As a result, a wide variety of information can be gleaned: for example, IT and technology-related frustrations that interfere with teams’ day-to-day experiences, working patterns common to all teams, and therefore opportunities for mentoring or learning, broken work patterns revealing tedious and unnecessary complexity in teams’ work patterns, among others. The alternative to the work graph is to rely on interviews with people, guesses, instinct and hope that changes in organizations will help. A recent Harvard Business Review article used work charts to reveal the gap between how management expects their teams to do the job and what actually happens is around 60%. Therefore, these organizations must first better understand the work experiences of their teams before making changes to benefit the team. Otherwise, their efforts might not be effective in helping their people.

The scale of data in the work graph is probably larger than social media, which is widely known to generate a large volume of data that powers businesses. For example, for every interaction on social media platforms (e.g. a user clicked “Search for a job” or “Like a comment”), there are 40 times more digital interactions that take place at work (e.g. “Sent an email”). After all, the world spends 6-8 hours a day on digital devices at work and there is data underlying these activities.

Until now, the world has not seen how we experience work as a technological problem. But the pandemic has changed that. Given the scale of office work around the world, this is a consumer-scale opportunity in the workplace. This will, I believe, be a theme for 2022.

– Rohan Murty is the founder and CTO of Soroco

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Ten principles of Frictionless Enterprise, a framework for digital work and business https://urabandai-ss.com/ten-principles-of-frictionless-enterprise-a-framework-for-digital-work-and-business/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 17:53:48 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/ten-principles-of-frictionless-enterprise-a-framework-for-digital-work-and-business/
(Photo © Andres Rodriguez – Fotolia)

For over a decade, I have been writing about Frictionless Enterprise as a global framework for planning a digital business strategy. This article sets out the essential principles of this approach, refined over the course of these ten years. This is the first chapter in a series of seven, in which I will continue to examine the implications for how businesses sell and interact with customers, how they organize their IT and manage their workforce, and how connected digital technologies – ubiquitous smart devices, large-scale cloud computing and near-ubiquitous connectivity – continue to change and reshape the business of today and tomorrow.

1. It’s all about connections

Connection is the most overlooked feature of modern digital technology. It’s at the heart of what makes these powerful tools so transformative in the way we organize work and conduct our business. The main goal of digital transformation should therefore be to remove any barrier or friction to connect and network.

The preeminence of connection is often missed as organizations instead focus on the task of upgrading their old systems and ways of working to digital alternatives. As early as 1999, I found it necessary to point out that cloud computing was not just an exercise in offshoring. As I said then, putting computing on the Internet moved it to a connected environment where it would be forced to adopt a more networked atomic architecture. The transition was not from on-premises to the cloud, but from disconnected to connected.

2. It’s not just about technology

Over the next decade, I realized the same transition was true for the company itself. Cloud computing was not the destination, but just the start of a much bigger journey, as connected digital technologies open up whole new ways of working and doing business. Presentation of the concept of frictionless business in an article from 2011, I wrote:

The modern successful business is one that is not set in stone, contained in its own “prem”. It must transcend physical walls and boundaries, leverage the cloud to share information, coordinate resources and interact with customers wherever they are.

3. There are five essential characteristics

The essence of Frictionless Enterprise is the elimination of friction to maximize the benefits of the digital connection. This manifests itself through five main characteristics:

  • All over – connection reduces distance, making it possible to collaborate and interact, regardless of location and time zone.
  • On demand – the infrastructure becomes pop-up. We don’t have to put plans on hold while we wait to build things or recruit teams. Self-service resources are instantly available.
  • In real time – we no longer have to wait for documents to arrive or for data to be updated. We can assess live data as it happens and take action immediately.
  • Ready for change – the processes are not fixed. We need to be able to adapt quickly and iteratively to the continuous flow of data and to the changing landscape of resources and markets.
  • Collaborative – teamwork is supercharged within the company, while external connections make it possible to pool resources, aggregate data, share context and jointly innovate through networked ecosystems .

4. Frictionless business means getting things done.

In one sentence, Frictionless Enterprise describes an organization that uses digitally connected technology to operate on real-time data and resources, available anywhere on demand, in a framework that is adaptive to change and inherently collaborative. But there is more. It’s not superficial, it’s end-to-end, enabling faster, more responsive decisions and actions across the organization. And although enabled by technology, it is best defined in terms of how the organization works:

Frictionless Enterprise is an enterprise architecture that optimizes the use of connected digital technologies to eliminate costs, delays and opacity when leveraging resources and achieving results. Simply put, it breaks down the barriers that prevent getting things done.

5. It reduces transaction costs

This new architecture is radically changing the nature of industrial-age business as it transforms to digital, disrupting the assumptions on which the modern business was built. As British economist Ronald Coase explained in a seminal 1937 article, The nature of the business, the friction that all of these barriers introduce – transaction costs, in economist terms – made it more profitable for industrial-age companies to do a lot of things in-house rather than sourcing them out. In the age of networks, the frictionless nature of the digital connection overturns this calculation:

Today’s connected digital infrastructure has completely transformed the economics of these transaction costs, fundamentally shifting the balance of the business. Much of the friction caused by time, distance and lack of information has been swept aside, forcing a complete recalculation of the cost-benefit analysis that led to the founding of the 20th century company.

6. Ungrouping and regrouping

A ubiquitous connection means that functions that in the past were typically performed in-house – IT is an obvious example – are now delivered faster, better, and cheaper by external vendors. Conversely, if core businesses are to be competitive in this hyper-connected economy, they must be completely redesigned for digital engagement. Often times, that means connecting with employees, partners and customers in entirely new ways.

Economists talk about the concept of unbundling and bundling, in which products or processes that were previously packaged together are separated and repackaged again. As the transaction costs of assembling and coordinating these components decrease, new configurations become possible, creating new business opportunities and competitive threats for incumbents.

Frictionless Enterprise is a massive exercise in unbundling and regrouping, as new models of digital connection enable the reconfiguration and reinvention of products, processes, entire organizations and even industries.

7. Pass paper

Digital transformation therefore goes far beyond the simple introduction of a new generation of technologies to automate existing processes. The industrial age business is structured around functional channels designed for the internal flow of static documents from one department to another, carrying the information they need with them. It is time to abandon this paper heritage. The digital connection means that contextual information can be viewed at any time, so that, for example, a vacation request can be submitted and approved with just a few clicks, rather than having to fill out and sign a form.

The digital connection thus opens up new avenues and shortcuts that produce results much more efficiently and with immensely less friction than these paper-based processes:

The frictionless business is structured around dynamic processes that connect content, resources and participants in a digital network, often crossing organizational boundaries.

8. Get out of the silos

The functional silos of the traditional company are part of this paper heritage. Reconfiguring information and process flows for Frictionless Enterprise means unbundling these traditional operations to dynamically consolidate them into networked configurations better suited to a connected digital world.

Internally, this means breaking down functional silos and strongholds to share information, know-how and agency where and when it is needed – for example, the convergence of sales and service teams, or the expansion of DevOps teams to include product managers.

The goal of Frictionless Enterprise is to enable your organization and all those who contribute to it to become a more effective participant of the network in all their interactions.

Externally, it means connecting to an ecosystem of suppliers and customers and becoming a networked business. Small players can connect to existing ecosystems, while large players can use their larger reach to facilitate their own ecosystems:

In Frictionless Enterprise, the best way to reduce transaction costs is to provide an optimized network platform that seamlessly brings together suppliers and buyers. The more friction your platform eliminates, the more you can justify reducing the reduced transaction cost.

9. Give autonomy

Unbundling and networking of functions and resources can only work effectively if these components and participants are able to act autonomously. It means breaking away from the command and control mindset of industrial-age enterprise to create a culture of trust and empowerment more suited to the distributed architecture of Frictionless Enterprise.

The continued atomization of the underlying technology infrastructure, with the emphasis on stand-alone components connecting through APIs and standardized contracts, is increasingly reflected in the business infrastructure it supports. The dynamic and distributed network of external suppliers, self-help teams and self-employed workers must hone their digital teamwork skills to manage and coordinate their production.

10. Continue to iterate

Frictionless Enterprise is a dynamic state, not a static destination. For established organizations, achieving this is a long and arduous journey, with significant changes required not only in technology infrastructure but also in business infrastructure, operational practices and organizational culture. But even the most agile must constantly re-evaluate the changing landscape, as technology continues to evolve, while early adopters are at the forefront of new business and operational models. The only way to approach this journey is to break it down into smaller stages and come up with intermediate advancements, while still being ready to reschedule the larger roadmap as you progress.

With that in mind, subsequent chapters in this series over the coming weeks will look at specific aspects of the journey:

  • Customer engagement and Everything-as-a-Service (XaaS)
  • Digital teamwork and the collaborative canvas
  • The tierless architecture of frictionless computing
  • The evolution of the digital user experience
  • Atomic talent and employee experience
  • Distributed ecosystems and decentralized trust systems

You can find all of these articles as published in our Frictionless Enterprise Archive Index. To receive notifications when new content appears, you can either follow the RSS feed on this page, stay in touch with us on Twitter and LinkedIn, or sign up to download The XaaS Effect for free and subscribe to the mailing list for our bimonthly Frictionless Enterprise e-newsletter.


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Governor of Hail cites Attaa Digital’s work to maintain homes of needy families https://urabandai-ss.com/governor-of-hail-cites-attaa-digitals-work-to-maintain-homes-of-needy-families/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 21:01:35 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/governor-of-hail-cites-attaa-digitals-work-to-maintain-homes-of-needy-families/

AMMAN: The King Salman Relief and Humanitarian Aid Center recently launched the second phase of a winter clothing distribution project in Jordan.

The project aims to help needy Jordanian families, as well as Syrian and Palestinian refugees, and is carried out in cooperation with the Jordanian Hashemite charity.

It includes the distribution of winter clothes and blankets to 31,911 families in 11 governorates, the Saudi press agency reported.

The director of the Jordanian branch of KSrelief, Saud Abdulaziz Al-Huzaim, said: “This seasonal project is an extension of ongoing projects aimed at meeting the basic needs of needy families and refugees in Jordan, in cooperation with official bodies. competent.

The secretary general of the Jordanian Hashemite Charity, Dr Hussein Al-Shibli, said the project has been carried out for three consecutive years with the support of KSrelief.

He added that 264,245 people across Jordan had benefited from the initiative.

The Kingdom, through the center, provides such projects to Syrian and Palestinian refugees, as well as to the most needy families in Jordan, to alleviate their suffering and improve their living conditions.

In Yemen, KSrelief distributed emergency shelters to displaced people in Marib, including 128 shelter tents that benefited 768 people.

This is part of the centre’s relief and humanitarian efforts to provide emergency shelter to Yemenis.

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Regulating digital work: from laissez-faire to fairness https://urabandai-ss.com/regulating-digital-work-from-laissez-faire-to-fairness/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/regulating-digital-work-from-laissez-faire-to-fairness/

The proposal for a European directive on platform work about to emerge is welcome, but insufficient – ​​and does not replace national action.

At the mercy of the platform (kentoh/shutterstock.com)

Comprehensive and fair regulation of working conditions, collective representation, social security rights and tax status of platform workers is at the heart of the challenges posed by the gig economy. The adoption of a European Union directive on working conditions in work platforms could deepen the debate on the future of work in an increasingly digital economy.

However, EU intervention alone will not resolve many of the key regulatory issues emerging from this debate. National governments and parliaments will have to step up their efforts.

Generalized anomie

The French jurist Alain Supiot asserts: “We are in a normative chaos at the international level, in a regime of generalized irresponsibility. There is no better example than the pervasive anomie in which, over the past decade, the platform economy has been allowed to grow fivefold, virtually in the absence of any national regulation, and yet less supranational.

This negligent let it be The attitude towards the multiple challenges presented by platform work can be contrasted with the much more practical approach that parliaments and governments adopted only a generation ago, in the face of the emergence of what used to be called (before it became ‘normal’) ‘atypical work’. part-time, fixed-term and interim These waves of national regulatory activity have typically preceded EU action in this area by a decade or two.

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It is a sign of our time – and of the “widespread irresponsibility” lamented by Supiot – that this time the European Commission is presenting proposals to protect platform workers well ahead of any comparable action at national level. , Member States at best trying to protect certain types of workers (such as couriers) and at worst ignoring the problem.

On the other hand, national legal systems have thrown their weight behind the issue. While this has greatly benefited many litigants, they have been unable to offer the comprehensive regulatory solutions that only legislative action can provide.

EU intervention is welcome and essential to regulate a phenomenon with an undeniable transnational dimension. But one directive alone is unlikely to be enough to exhaust the need for further national regulatory action.

Really workers?

First, there are already indications that EU regulatory efforts will fall short of what is needed to answer the central question of the debate: are platform workers really workers? In setting the personal scope of the future directive, it is difficult to see the EU going much beyond the definition contained in the 2019 directive on transparent and predictable working conditions.

Armed with this wording alone – although in many ways broader than any previous instrument of EU labor law – the Court of Justice of the EU is unlikely to remedy the faux pas of its 2020 decision in Zipline. There, the presence of an overriding clause in a courier’s contract with a food delivery platform was seen as an indication of self-reliance and entrepreneurship, thus negating employment status.

With this in mind, De Stefano and Aloisi argue that a much broader scope would be needed, as also postulated in a recent study for the European Economic and Social Committee. But the commission is unlikely to have the courage to take up this challenge.

Collective bargaining

A second concern relates to the right to bargain collectively. The Commission’s proposals have refused to engage seriously in this, leaving it to the Directorate-General for Competition and its initiative on collective bargaining for the self-employed.

Even the broadest regulatory option attached to this initiative would fall short of the need for collective representation of platform workers, many of whom are likely to be mislabeled or categorized as self-employed. Full regulation of powerful multinational platforms cannot be achieved if unions representing vulnerable workers have one hand tied behind their backs by competition authorities.

Finally, action risks being hampered by the limited competence of EU legislative institutions, particularly in the areas of social security and taxation. Recommendation 2019/387 on access to social protection for workers and the self-employed is weakened by the lack of precise definitions of what constitutes a worker and a self-employed person, as well as by its non-binding nature. Member states will no doubt have to step in with a sense of purpose, recognizing that “the majority of workers on digital work platforms do not have social security coverage”.


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Taxation is even trickier. Problems related to the tax status of declared self-employed workers are compounded by jurisdictional disputes and the lack of firm EU competence.

Socialization of losses

These four issues – scope, collective bargaining, social security and taxation – are at the heart of the fairness and distribution issues of regulating the business model of platform companies, a model that too often privatizes profits while socializing the loss. As a recent policy paper from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development states, regulators should “ensure a level playing field between businesses by preventing platform operators from gaining a competitive advantage by avoiding their obligations and responsibilities”.

Unfortunately, EU intervention alone will not solve these regulatory conundrums. National governments and parliaments will have to step up their efforts. In this respect, their implementation of a European directive on working conditions in platform work should inspire a common reflection on the future of work in an increasingly digitized economy.

platform work, digital work, directive

Nicola Countouris is Director of the Research Department of the European Trade Union Institute and Professor of Labor Law and European Law at University College London.

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from laissez-faire to equity – Nicola Countouris https://urabandai-ss.com/from-laissez-faire-to-equity-nicola-countouris/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://urabandai-ss.com/from-laissez-faire-to-equity-nicola-countouris/

The proposal for a European directive on platform work about to emerge is welcome, but insufficient – ​​and does not replace national action.

At the mercy of the platform (kentoh/shutterstock.com)

Comprehensive and fair regulation of working conditions, collective representation, social security rights and tax status of platform workers is at the heart of the challenges posed by the gig economy. The adoption of a European Union directive on working conditions in work platforms could deepen the debate on the future of work in an increasingly digital economy.

However, EU intervention alone will not resolve many of the key regulatory issues emerging from this debate. National governments and parliaments will have to step up their efforts.

Generalized anomie

The French jurist Alain Supiot asserts: “We are in a normative chaos at the international level, in a regime of generalized irresponsibility. There is no better example than the pervasive anomie in which, over the past decade, the platform economy has been allowed to grow fivefold, virtually in the absence of any national regulation, and yet less supranational.

This negligent let it be The attitude towards the multiple challenges presented by platform work can be contrasted with the much more practical approach that parliaments and governments took only a generation ago, in the face of the emergence of what used to be called (before it became ‘normal’) ‘atypical work’. part-time, fixed-term and interim Typically, these waves of national regulatory activity preceded EU action in this area by a decade or two.

.

It is a sign of our time – and of the “widespread irresponsibility” lamented by Supiot – that this time the European Commission is presenting proposals to protect platform workers well ahead of any comparable action at national level. , Member States at best trying to protect certain types of workers (such as couriers) and at worst ignoring the problem.

On the other hand, national legal systems have thrown their weight behind the issue. While this has greatly benefited many litigants, they have been unable to offer the comprehensive regulatory solutions that only legislative action can provide.

EU intervention is welcome and essential to regulate a phenomenon with an undeniable transnational dimension. But a directive alone is unlikely to be enough to exhaust the need for further national regulatory action.

Really workers?

First, there are already indications that EU regulatory efforts will fall short of what is needed to answer the central question of the debate: are platform workers really workers? In setting the personal scope of the future directive, it is difficult to see the EU going much beyond the definition contained in the 2019 directive on transparent and predictable working conditions.

Armed with this wording alone – although in many ways broader than any previous instrument of EU labor law – the Court of Justice of the EU is unlikely to remedy the faux pas of its 2020 decision in Zipline. There, the presence of an overriding clause in a courier’s contract with a food delivery platform was seen as an indication of self-reliance and entrepreneurship, thus negating employment status.


Be part of our progressive community

Social Europe is a independent publisher and we believe in free content. For this model to be sustainable, we depend on the solidarity of our loyal readers – we depend on you. Become a member of Social Europe for less than 5 euros per month and help advance progressive politics. Thank you very much!

Become a member of Social Europe

With this in mind, De Stefano and Aloisi argue that a much broader scope would be needed, as also postulated by a recent study for the European Economic and Social Committee. But the commission is unlikely to have the courage to take up this challenge.

Collective bargaining

A second concern relates to the right to bargain collectively. The Commission’s proposals have refused to engage seriously in this, leaving it to the Directorate-General for Competition and its initiative on collective bargaining for the self-employed.

Even the broadest regulatory option attached to this initiative would fall short of the need for collective representation of platform workers, many of whom are likely to be mislabeled or categorized as self-employed. Full regulation of powerful multinational platforms cannot be achieved if unions representing vulnerable workers have one hand tied behind their backs by competition authorities.

Finally, action risks being hampered by the limited competence of EU legislative institutions, particularly in the areas of social security and taxation. Recommendation 2019/387 on access to social protection for workers and the self-employed is weakened by the absence of precise definitions of what constitutes a worker and a self-employed person, as well as by its non-binding nature. Member states will no doubt have to step in with a sense of purpose, recognizing that “the majority of workers on digital work platforms do not have social security coverage”.

Taxation is even trickier. Problems related to the tax status of declared self-employed workers are compounded by jurisdictional disputes and the lack of firm EU competence.

Socialization of losses

These four issues – scope, collective bargaining, social security and taxation – are at the heart of the fairness and distribution issues of regulating the business model of platform companies, a model that too often privatizes profits while socializing the loss. As a recent policy paper from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development states, regulators should “ensure a level playing field between businesses by preventing platform operators from gaining a competitive advantage by avoiding their obligations and responsibilities”.

Unfortunately, EU intervention alone will not solve these regulatory conundrums. National governments and parliaments will have to step up their efforts. In this respect, their implementation of a European directive on working conditions in platform work should inspire a common reflection on the future of work in an increasingly digitized economy.

Nicola Countouris is Director of the Research Department of the European Trade Union Institute and Professor of Labor Law and European Law at University College London.

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